Fish Facts: Siberian Taimen (Hucho taimen)


The largest of all salmonids, these voracious predators are sometimes called “river wolves."
Photo by Ojensen at English Wikipedia

A true river monster, the taimen (Hucho taimen)—also known as the Siberian taimen—can grow to proportions that seem incredible to your average trout fishermen. Whereas John Gierach once . . .

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Fish Facts: Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout


The iconic species of our oldest national park, the Yellowstone cutthroat draws anglers from around the world.
Photo by USFWS

The names of many legendary fishing spots in Yellowstone National Park—Buffalo Ford, the Lamar Valley, the meadows of Slough Creek—are synonymous with big, native Yellowstone cutthroat . . .

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Fish Facts: Largemouth Bass, a.k.a Ol’ Bucketmouth


Illustration by Duane Raver via USFWS

Among the more widely distributed game fish in North America, and now around the world, the largemouth bass is prized for its aggressive feeding habits and violent strikes. A big bass blowing up the water around a popper chugging across flat water is. . .

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Fish Facts: Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha )


Alaska produces some monster kings, such as this Kanektok River beast.
Photo by Chris Morgan, www.twosherpas.com

Every June and July, anglers flock to Alaska for a chance to test their mettle—and their tackle—against king salmon, which regularly top 50 pounds and are muscular brutes after living at . . .

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Fish Facts: Everything You Wanted to Know About the Common Carp But Were Afraid to Ask


Carp may be an invasive species, but many fly fishers love them.
Photo courtesy Mike Mazzoni

Unlike trout, common carp (Cyprinus carpio) are unattractive, slimy, feed almost exclusively below the surface, and rarely inhabit clear mountain streams—choosing instead to live in turbid or brackish waters. For these reasons, the species was denigrated as a “trash fish” by . . .

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Fish Facts: Dolly Varden (Salvelinus malma)


This illustration of a Dolly Varden is from Evermann and Goldsborough's The Fishes of Alaska (1907).
Photo via Wikipedia

Like the two species to which is it closely related—Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus)—the Dolly Varden (Salvelinus malma) is a true char that is found . . .

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Fish Facts: Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis)


Wild brook trout are prized by anglers, but their habitat is disappearing.
Photo by Sandy Hays

Although the brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) is not, in a fact, a trout at all, it is the most “troutlike” of the charrs. A sought-after game fish because it often lives in pristine waters and. . .

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Fish Facts: Lake Trout (Salvelinus namaycush)


Although few fly fishers target them, lake trout will readily take flies, especially early and late in the year.
Photo courtesy New York Department of Conservation

In fly-fishing circles, the lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) is perhaps the least respected of all the “trout” species. (It’s actually a char, of course, a close relative of brook trout, bull trout, and . . .

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Fish Facts: American Shad (Alosa sapidissima)


The American shad features a silvery body, blue-green back, and dark spots starting near the top
of the gill plate and running laterally rearward, as well as a deeply forked tail.
Photo by Duane Raver, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

While salmon, steelhead, and striper runs garnish the most attention from the angling press, the annual migration of American shad offers fly fishers the chance to tangle with a brawny . . .

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Fish Facts: Sculpins (genus Cottus)


Prickly sculpin (Cottus asper) demonstrates the classic sculpin shape: big head, wide fins, tapering body.
Photo by U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Ever since Don Gapen tied the first Muddler Minnow in 1936, fly fishers have recognized that freshwater sculpins (genus Cottus) can be important forage fish for trout, and there are now . . .

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